In plain sight

They sit around the table, three casually dressed men peering over open pages with avid interest. One takes notes as he reads, the other chews silently on an apple and the third, he spends twenty seconds of each minute starring at the unopened books as though they inspired him.

Nothing strange about the scene, except it was hours past midnight and they hadn’t gained access by asking nicely.

“Captain I have completed the task, Sir.”

“Good. You’re certain the code will not be easily deciphered.”

“I am certain, Sir.”

“Lieutenant take a look at it and ensure the details are as desired.”

An hour later.

Handing over the  documents, he said “Everything is as it should be Sir.”

“You may return to base, I’ll handle the rest.”

“Yes Sir.” 

He conscience sought for peace. How the words peace, and humanity could have narrow or all encompassing meanings depending on where you were and who was speaking was beyond him. His job as a lieutenant was proving tougher than being on the front lines.

Copyright TJ Paris

For some reason all I could see from the photo was covert meetings in unsuspecting venues.

In response to the writing challenge flash fiction for aspiring writers hosted by Priceless Joy click on the link to visit the blog. The photograph is from TJ Paris (interesting photo can’t wait to see all the stories it inspires) and the challenge is to write a 100 – 150 words (+/- 25 words) story inspired by it. Do click on the link for other stories.

 

Advertisements

26 thoughts on “In plain sight

      1. If you describe something as it’s happening, you SHOW the reader what’s going on and they become involved; if it’s already happened, you’re only TELLING them, so there’s less engagement.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Great slice into this man’s complicated life. I enjoyed the story and its many possibilities. I especially love the following lines:

    (1) Nothing strange about the scene, except it was hours past midnight and they hadn’t gained access by asking nicely.

    (2) How the words peace and humanity could have narrow or all encompassing meanings depending on where you were, and who was speaking, was beyond him.

    Awesome job!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Well written.

    For some reason I’m reminded of the biopic- The Imitation Game, a movie about a secret group of cryptanalysts headed by Alan Turing during World War II.

    That picture reminded me that I haven’t stepped inside a library in a while. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A fascinating story, Chioma. I’m intrigued as to the purpose of their meeting. 🙂 I love the thought in the final paragraph: ‘How the words peace, and humanity could have narrow or all encompassing meanings depending on where you were and who was speaking was beyond him.’
    I’m not entirely sure I agree with Dermot’s view of present tense. Past tense is usually seen as being more immediate as it’s more familiar to the reader and doesn’t jar as present tense can. I like to use it occasionally in flash fiction but for longer pieces I find it unwieldy. You also need to ensure your tenses are consistent (‘said’ and ‘sought’ are both past tense). Here’s an interesting article on the subject you might want to read: http://www.novel-writing-help.com/past-tense.html. You can find other arguments for both sides with a google search. I hope you find this useful. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome, Chioma.
        My day started really well – I went for a walk at dawn and took some lovely pictures. Then I arrived home and heard the results of the referendum and my day took a rapid turn for the worse. 😦 Personally, I think the UK has made a massive mistake.
        I hope you’re well.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I am, thank you.
        I agree with you, but I also find myself happy with the results because it leaves no room for politicians to hide again. And I think things will be better but it all depends on who steers the boat now.

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s